Thursday, April 30, 2015

Umbrella Didn't Help

The umbrella didn't keep him dry.
Sometimes it's just better to get out of the rain than to use an umbrella.  The gentleman in the above photo experienced what can happen if you hold an umbrella with one hand and control the bicycle with the other hand.  Riding in the rain is tough enough with both hands on the handlebars.  At least he landed in the soft water, it was the pavement underneath that might have caused a problem.

Visit us at Circle City Bicycles to find your first or next high quality bike.

Monday, April 27, 2015

The Wright Cycle Company

The Fourth of Five Buildings Occupied by the Wright Cycle Company
Photo courtesy of Touring Ohio
Without a doubt, the most famous bicycle mechanics of all time are Orville and Wilbur Wright. Most people know they had a bicycle company before building airplanes, but think they must have sold highwheelers. They sold what were called "safety bicycles" at the time, but are the basic design of today's bicycles. Safety bicycles became popular in the late 1880s, which led to the bike boom of the 1890s. They prevented the dangerous headers that could occur with the highwheelers, where a sudden stop could send the rider over the handlebars.

The Wright brothers formed the Wright Cycle Exchange, located in Dayton, in 1892. They picked a good time and location to open their store. The League of American Wheelmen held their 1892 convention in Dayton. Thousand of cyclists attended and toured the city of Dayton. One of the most popular attractions was the Central National Soldiers Home. Many cyclists would have passed right by the Wright brothers shop on their ride to this landmark.

The Wrights operated their bike store at five different locations in Dayton. They eventually changed the name of the business to Wright Cycle Company. They sold bicycles from a variety of manufacturers, priced between forty and one hundred dollars. They also sold bike parts and accessories, and rented bikes. In 1896 they began selling their own bikes, a model called the Van Cleve and a cheaper bike called the St. Clair.

For a while the bicycle business was financially successful for the Wright brothers. Their best year was 1897 when they made $3,000. A good wage at that time was $500 per year. The Wrights were able to save $5,000 to fund some of their early aviation work. After 1897 large manufacturers began producing bicycles and prices dropped to as low as ten dollars. In four years, the Wright brothers were forced to reduce the price of the Van Cleve fifty percent, and they stopped making the St. Clair. They soon turned to aviation where they had considerable success, making their first flight in 1903. They did not sell any bicycles after 1904, but it was several more years before they sold the last of their bicycle parts.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Friday Photo - Fish Bicycle

The Fish Bicycle
Photo courtesy of the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic
The 44th Annual Iron Horse Bicycle Classic will be held Memorial Weekend in Durango, Colorado. They will have events all day on Saturday & Sunday, and a time trial Monday morning. These include races such as:

It also includes rides for non-racers:
There is also the Durango Cyclery Cruiser Criterium, where almost anything human powered with wheels is allowed. This brings us to the Fish Bicycle, which is this week's Friday Photo.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

[Sneak Peek] 2016 Scott Addict CX Carbon Cyclocross Bike

Redesigned 2016 Addict CX from Scott Bicycles - With Huge Improvements!





The Addict CX is back, and its fitter than ever. Weighing in below 1300g, the Addict CX frameset is lighter than any other disc brake-optimized cross bike on the market.




CONSTRUCTION


LIGHTWEIGHT CARBON CONSTRUCTION


Light weight is the shared bloodline connecting all SCOTT product segments. Early on, SCOTT invested heavily into the development of new carbon manufacturing technologies, the use of exclusive raw materials and the optimization of development processes. The continuous advancement of SCOTT’s carbon expertise enables the release of stunningly lightweight products on a regular basis. The Addict CX is no exception to this rule.

The frame uses an HMX carbon fiber blend that has inherently excellent stiffness-to-weight characteristics. The front triangle of the Addict CX is manufactured using SCOTT’s patented IMP Technology which results in incredibly lightweight construction. Rounded off with full carbon, hollow rear dropouts the frame weighs in at 890g while the disc brake-optimized fork tips the scale at 390g. The race-ready, disc brake-equipped Addict CX, which Marcel Wildhaber rode at the 2015 CX World Championships in Tabor, is scrapping The UCI’s weight limit for complete bikes.




Thanks to SCOTT’s Engineer’s Carbon expertise, the Addict CX is by far the lightest disc brake-optimized Cyclo-Cross bike currently on the market.



DISC BRAKES

Naturally, Scott has graced its latest carbon 'cross racer with front and rear disc brakes and thru-axles at both ends. Riders will be able to use either 140mm or 160mm-diameter rotors, as well as either Shimano's upcoming Flat Mount brake calipers or current post mount ones with an adapter. The rear end uses the conventional 142x12mm axle dimensions while the front goes with the new 100x12mm standard.


Thru-axles and disc brakes were chosen for the new design from the outset. While the rear end uses the current 142x12mm axle size, the front end uses the new 100x12mm standard


Tire clearance is greatly increased all around with the new bike said to accommodate tires up to 40mm wide. The tops of the chainstays are even shaped so as to help cleave caked-on mud from the sides of the tire, and there's not even the hint of a shelf behind the bottom bracket shell on which debris can accumulate.




Cable routing is fully internal and convertible via a series of interchangeable 'chips' at the head tube and rear dropout. Mechanical and electronic drivetrains are easily accommodated, and there's even an optional port for an internally routed dropper seatpost should you want to use one.




One particularly clever feature is the front derailleur tab. Not only is it (and the mini-chain keeper below it) removable when using a 1x drivetrain but the mounting holes can instead be used for a custom mini-chain guide for what should be an ultra-reliable single-chainring setup. That chainguide is even ultra light at just 22g (claimed).

Keep your eyes peeled for more 2016 bikes coming out in the next few months! We will be posting reviews and videos showing off all the features of this bike





Circle City Bicycles and Fitness
5506 Madison Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
(317) 786-9244






Monday, April 20, 2015

Sir Bradley Wiggins

Bradley Wiggins won the 2012 Tour de France
Bradley Wiggins rode with Team Sky for the last time at the recent Paris-Roubaix road race, so I thought this would be a good time to write about him. Wiggins was born in Belgium, where his father was a professional cyclist. His mother was British, and after his parents split, Bradley moved with his mother to London.

Wiggins' interest in cycling began when he watched the British cyclist Chris Boardman (The same one that is the Research & Development Director at Boardman Bikes, which Circle City Bicycles sells) win the gold medal for individual pursuit at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. He first competed in a cycling race at the age of 12, and joined the Archer Road Club, as his father had done years earlier.

Bradley's early racing career focused on track cycling, although he has always competed in both road and track cycling. At the 2004 Olympics in Athens Wiggins won gold in the individual pursuit, just as Boardman had done twelve years earlier. He also won a silver in the team pursuit and a bronze in the Madison. Four years later in Beijing, Bradly successfully defended his gold in the individual pursuit. He also took home a gold medal in the team pursuit for good measure. At the 2012 London Olympics Wiggins won a gold in the time trial, raising hos total medal count to seven.

In 2003 Wiggins competed in the Giro d'Italia, his first of the grand tours. In 2005 he began to focus more on road racing. Bradley road in his first Tour de France in 2006, finishing 124th. In the 2007 Tour de France Wiggins' team withdrew after one of its riders failed a drug test. After focusing on the Olympics in 2008, Wiggins returned to the tour in 2009, and finished fourth, which established him as a real contender for the title.

Wiggins began riding for Team Sky, the new British cycling team in 2010 as team leader. It was a difficult year for him, as he finished 40th in the Giro, and 24th in the Tour de France. In 2011 he bypassed the Giro to concentrate on the Tour de France. Unfortunately, Bradley was involved in a crash during stage 7, and broke his collarbone, ending his tour. In 2012 everything came together for Wiggins and Team Sky. He put in a dominating performance to win the Tour de France, and his teammate Chris Froome came in second. Bradley also won three smaller races, along with taking gold at the Olympics in 2012. To top it all off, he was knighted by the Queen. The following year, physical ailments forced him to withdraw from the Giro and not participate in the Tour de France, which was won by Chris Froome. In 2014, he was not selected by Team Sky to ride in the Tour de France, which went with Chris Froome as team leader.

Wiggins rode his last race as a member of Team Sky on April 12, finishing 18th in the Paris-Roubaix race. He will now compete for his newly formed Team Wiggins squad, and will focus on preparing for track cycling at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.  On June 7, he will make an attempt to break the one hour record, which currently stands at 52.491 kilometers (About 32.5 miles).

Friday, April 17, 2015

Friday Photo - Mountain Biking Mongolia

Mountain biking through Mongolia
(Photo courtesy of Tom Allen)
While searching for interesting cycling photos this week I ran across the photo above. Now this is cycling in a remote area! The title of the accompanying article is "Adventure Cycling In Mongolia", which is quite interesting. The two guys (Tom Allen and his friend Andy) who went on the trip live in Armenia, so they took a train to Ulan Bator, the capital of Mongolia. The city has a population of about 1.3 million, which is about the same as Indianapolis.

They kept their plans fairly simple and flexible. Mongolia is best known for its Gobi Desert, which they wisely decided to bypass. Over a few weeks they rode about 600 miles. Most of what they road was pasture. Despite the remoteness, they said you could generally see a yurt (The tent Mongolian nomads live in), and they would run across people each day.Every day or two the would pass through a small town. The locals were friendly. Each time they stopped at a yurt to ask directions, they were invited in for tea.

Overall, they found the terrain more varied and more populated than they expected. Even in the remote areas there were people herding animals. Biking there was also safer and more practical than expected. Tom said Mongolia is his favorite out of the 30 or so countries in which he has cycled.

If cycling Mongolia on your own sounds difficult, there are companies who organize these tours. One of these is Spiceroads. Their 14 day trip has 8 full days of cycling, and also includes sightseeing of archery, wrestling and horse racing events. Cost is a little over three thousand dollars.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

2015 Fuji Altamira SL VIDEO REVIEW — Light Race-Ready Ride That's Great On Climbs

Why ride up the mountains when you can float up them on the 2015 Fuji Altamira SL



Ultra-lightweight, all-around competition platform that excels on the climbs.

Fuji outfitted this bike to be ready for climbing and racing straight out of the box. Every component was carefully thought out to deliver minimal weight and maximum performance. The Oval Concepts 724 aero alloy clinchers are lightweight, and offer superior braking performance. Fuji used their top level C15 carbon fiber, and their revolutionary high compaction molding process. What this new process does is basically eliminate wrinkles and squeeze out every spare drop of epoxy. This makes for a denser, more consistent and lighter weight carbon layup than is usually found on bikes. They also looked at tube shape and thickness, tapering the top tube near the seat tube junction to save weight in low-stress areas.








The Oval 910SL handlebars, Oval 960 seatpost and Oval 900 saddle all feature full carbon fiber construction to shed excess grams and increase comfort and performance.

 The Fork is a FC-330 carbon monocoque with an oversized, tapered full carbon steer tube for optimal stiffness and handling. The rake provides a level of handling that is impressively responsive without being twitchy or pushing you to the limits of comfort.









ABOUT SRAM RED 22: SRAM Red 22, with True 22 technology, is SRAM's best groupset yet. With the incredible YAW front derailleur, which revolutionized front shifting. Red 22 uses True 22 technology to eliminate the possibility of chainrub, even with the wider 11-speed sprocket.


The shifters and rear derailleur also have the latest iterations of ZeroLoss and Exact Actuation shifting so the chain moves smoothly across the cassette, even with the addition of the 11th cog--something that previous 11-speed groups have struggled to do. Lastly, the crankset is stiffer and lighter than ever before. In fact, Red 22 is claimed to be the lightest groupset on the market, and after picking up one of the cranksets, we believe it.

The Altamira is a climbing machine, light and nimble, it makes going uphill as good as it gets; Even beyond the engineered physical attributes of this bike, the sheer lightness of it will make you climb better. Climbing specialists will love it, as will the gravitationally challenged. If you regularly ride a bike of say 7.7kgs, try lugging 1.5kgs of extra weight next time you ride and see what it feels like when you offload! Making the move to such a lightweight machine will surprise you.

SPECS:

Bottom Bracket:SRAM Red, press-fit, BB86, ceramic bearing
Brakes: SRAM Red
Cassette: SRAM Red PowerDome, 11-26T, 11-speed
Chain: KMC X11SL Ni-Ti plated, 11-speed
Crankset: SRAM Red22 carbon, 53/39T
Fork: FC-330 carbon monocoque w/ tapered carbon steerer & carbon dropout
Frame: C15 ultra high-modulus carbon w/ High Compaction Molding System, integrated head tube w/ 1 1/2" lower, oversized PIIS BB86 shell, double water bottle mounts
Front Derailleur: SRAM Red22, braze-on mount
Grips/Tape: Oval Concepts 300, padded suede
Handlebar: Oval Concepts R910SL, carbon, 31.8mm
Headset: FSA, 1 1/8" upper - 1 1/2" lower, integratedw/ carbon top cover
Levers: SRAM Red22 ErgoDynamic
Pedals: None
Rack Mounts: None
Rear Derailleur: SRAM Red22, 11-speed
Saddle: Oval Concepts R900 w/ carbon rails
Seatpost: Oval Concepts 960, full carbon, 31.6mm, double-bolt micro-adjust
Shifters: SRAM Red22, ErgoDynamic, 11-speed
Stem: Oval Concepts 913, carbon matrix 3D-forged 7050 alloy, 31.8mm, +/- 6°
Tires: Vittoria Open Corsa CX, 700 x 23, 320 tpi
Wheelset: Oval 724 aero alloy clincher, tubeless ready, 20 / 27h





Circle City Bicycles and Fitness
5506 Madison Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
(317) 786-9244

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Limited Parking Space

Just another day in Belgium.
If you drive to work every day and when you get to your work, you have a hard time finding a parking space, just check the above photo. In Belgium 8% of all trips are made by bike.  The average distance cycled per person per day is 0.9 km. Cycling is a national sport for the Belgians. Belgians are very serious about their bike. A real Belgian keeps an expensive, quality bike well maintained with functioning brakes and inflated tires and usually wears a helmet and a bright yellow vest to make him or herself visible to car.  So, when it takes a bit to find a parking spot for your car, just think what it could be like finding a spot for your bike.
Come and visit Circle City Bicycles to find that bike you have been looking for and can park anywhere.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A New Strategy For Planning Bike Routes

  

Indianapolis Mayor Ballard Might Want to Take Note of This Method



"We are making great strides to make Indianapolis a more bicycle-friendly city. By the end of 2011, we will have more than doubled the miles of bike lanes in Indianapolis - from 30 to 63. Creating a designated space on the road for bicycles makes it more convenient and safer for bicyclists to get around the City and promotes a healthier lifestyle for our residents."

Mayor Greg Ballard

Not so very long ago, it was a right of passage for grade school kids to be able to ride their bike to school. It was not uncommon for this to start at about age 8. Fast forward a few decades and many parents who had this very privilege themselves would never allow their kids the opportunity. The twin fears of crime and traffic are most likely the culprit. 

Good news!  Crime is now about the same as it was in the 1950's. You wouldn't know it by the news, but for most neighborhoods in Indianapolis, the fear is unfounded. 

Traffic, on the other hand, is a bit more crowded than in the past. One city has come up with a very 2015 way of figuring out how to potentially direct kids to the safest routes, and potentially open up a fantastic way to improve kid's health and reduce carbon footprints. 

According the Mobilitylab.org, the city of Alexandria VA, employed high tech hackers to plot out the various routes young adults at a local high school would most likely take to get home from school.  

If you asked a student how long it takes to get from her high school to her house on a bike, she might tell you how long it takes to drive – something she’s familiar with – followed by a guess that it takes even longer to ride home on a bike.
Of course, the real answer for biking home depends not only where students live and the distance, but on the other important conditions such as a route’s safety, car traffic, light timing, and the access to safe crossings. So how could you answer this question for an entire school’s population? Organize a Radius Ride!
Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.
In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high-school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and schoolbus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries (in Alexandria, these are the same as the city limits). These paths radiated out from the school much like spokes in a wheel and went through or ended in many of the population centers of the city. (The original paths can be seen in the picture below.)
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf
If you asked a student how long it takes to get from her high school to her house on a bike, she might tell you how long it takes to drive – something she’s familiar with – followed by a guess that it takes even longer to ride home on a bike.
Of course, the real answer for biking home depends not only where students live and the distance, but on the other important conditions such as a route’s safety, car traffic, light timing, and the access to safe crossings. So how could you answer this question for an entire school’s population? Organize a Radius Ride!
Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.
In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high-school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and schoolbus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries (in Alexandria, these are the same as the city limits). These paths radiated out from the school much like spokes in a wheel and went through or ended in many of the population centers of the city. (The original paths can be seen in the picture below.)

Next, we recruited experienced riders who could face our inconsistently bike-friendly roads. We asked them to bring a cell phone loaded with an app, like Strava, that could collect and export the route data in the commonly-used GPX file format. Because many of Alexandria’s streets still don’t have bike lanes, we wanted experienced riders who could handle the sometimes-stressful roads and intersections. On the designated day, riders took to their routes and recorded their rides.
When all the rides were completed, we sent the GPX files to Mobility Lab’s tech guru Michael Schade. He spent several long nights compiling the data and creating a way to display the information in a very informative full-motion graphic of the entire event.





So what did they learn? For the rest of the story:

Next, we recruited experienced riders who could face our inconsistently bike-friendly roads. We asked them to bring a cell phone loaded with an app, like Strava, that could collect and export the route data in the commonly-used GPX file format. Because many of Alexandria’s streets still don’t have bike lanes, we wanted experienced riders who could handle the sometimes-stressful roads and intersections. On the designated day, riders took to their routes and recorded their rides.
When all the rides were completed, we sent the GPX files to Mobility Lab’s tech guru Michael Schade. He spent several long nights compiling the data and creating a way to display the information in a very informative full-motion graphic of the entire event.
Chart
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf
If you asked a student how long it takes to get from her high school to her house on a bike, she might tell you how long it takes to drive – something she’s familiar with – followed by a guess that it takes even longer to ride home on a bike.
Of course, the real answer for biking home depends not only where students live and the distance, but on the other important conditions such as a route’s safety, car traffic, light timing, and the access to safe crossings. So how could you answer this question for an entire school’s population? Organize a Radius Ride!
Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.
In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high-school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and schoolbus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries (in Alexandria, these are the same as the city limits). These paths radiated out from the school much like spokes in a wheel and went through or ended in many of the population centers of the city. (The original paths can be seen in the picture below.)
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf

If you asked a student how long it takes to get from her high school to her house on a bike, she might tell you how long it takes to drive – something she’s familiar with – followed by a guess that it takes even longer to ride home on a bike.
Of course, the real answer for biking home depends not only where students live and the distance, but on the other important conditions such as a route’s safety, car traffic, light timing, and the access to safe crossings. So how could you answer this question for an entire school’s population? Organize a Radius Ride!
Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.
In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high-school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and schoolbus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries (in Alexandria, these are the same as the city limits). These paths radiated out from the school much like spokes in a wheel and went through or ended in many of the population centers of the city. (The original paths can be seen in the picture below.)
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf
If you asked a student how long it takes to get from her high school to her house on a bike, she might tell you how long it takes to drive – something she’s familiar with – followed by a guess that it takes even longer to ride home on a bike.
Of course, the real answer for biking home depends not only where students live and the distance, but on the other important conditions such as a route’s safety, car traffic, light timing, and the access to safe crossings. So how could you answer this question for an entire school’s population? Organize a Radius Ride!
Radius Rides are organized events in which a group of cyclists starting from the same location, like a high-school parking lot, library, or shopping center take routes away from there. This actual ride data is then valuable for showing the local public how far one can get on a bike in five, 10, or 15-minute intervals from the selected starting point. The rides are relaxed-speed group rides – not races – for the purpose of recording data to plot on maps.
In Alexandria, Virginia, we chose the high-school’s main campus as the start of our first Radius Ride because it is central to the city and generates a lot of car and schoolbus traffic. Starting from the high-school parking lot, we traced out routes along the roads and paths that led to the edge of the school’s boundaries (in Alexandria, these are the same as the city limits). These paths radiated out from the school much like spokes in a wheel and went through or ended in many of the population centers of the city. (The original paths can be seen in the picture below.)
- See more at: http://mobilitylab.org/2015/04/13/school-bicycling-safety-in-alexandria-virginia-gets-a-look-from-tech-hackers/#sthash.WCu8xPvO.dpuf

Monday, April 13, 2015

The Redbud Ride

Redbuds will be blooming soon!
My favorite time of the year for riding is when redbud trees are blooming. The folks in London, Kentucky must feel the same way, because they have an annual bike ride called the Redbud Ride. London is a town of about 8,000 people, about an hour south of Lexington. It's about a four hour drive to get there from Indianapolis. The Redbud Ride is held on Saturday, April 25. There is another ride on Friday in nearby Barbourville, Kentucky called the Redbud Warm-up. It coincides with the Redbud Festival of Appalachian Culture at Union College (These folks really like their redbuds). On Sunday there is a lightly supported ride called the Redbud Recovery.

The cost for the Redbud Ride on Saturday is $35. It has four route options:

  • 23 miles
  • 38 miles
  • 70 miles
  • 102 miles
There are sag stops approximately every 20 miles. With your registration you get a T-shirt, pancake breakfast from the London Rotary Club, plus a post-event meal and music. The Redbud Warm-up has two ride options and a couple of sag stops. It costs $25 and you get another T-shirt. Sunday's Redbud Recovery is free. It is hosted by a local shop in London called Mike's Hike and Bike.

For information on how to get there and local hotels, visit the Redbud Ride's Travel & Hotel Info page. If you prefer to camp, the Levi Jackson Wilderness Road State Park is not far away. 



Friday, April 10, 2015

Friday Photo - Boneshaker

This boneshaker sold for over $5,000 at auction
Source: Case Antiques
In an earlier post I wrote about the drasienne, which was invented in 1817 in Germany. Its main drawback was that it lacked pedals. It wasn't until the 1860s that someone got the bright idea of adding pedals. This idea originated in France, but it isn't clear who first came up with it. Various sources credit:

  • Pierre Michaux
  • Ernest Michaux
  • Pierre Lallement
  • The Olivier brothers (Aimé, René, & Marius)
A French business called Michaux & Company was the first to mass produce bicycles, which led to a bicycle craze in the 1870s. Bicycles of this type were called "Boneshakers" for the following reasons:
  • The frames were made of stiff and heavy wrought iron - Not conducive to shock absorption
  • The tires were wooden, with a strip of iron around the outside
  • Also keep in mind that roads at this time were often cobblestone
Designers attempted to alleviate this problem by mounting the saddle on a strip of metal supported at both ends instead of attaching it directly to the frame, This allowed for some deflection to absorb shock. Although these boneshakers were a big improvement over the drasienne, they still had a couple big drawbacks:
  • They were not easy to ride, since the pedaling motion would cause the front wheel to turn from side to side, making steering difficult.
  • The front wheel was about a yard in diameter, so they were slow, since there was no gearing
The second problem would later be solved by the next step in bicycle evolution, the classic high wheeler, also known as the ordinary or the penny -farthing. Not many boneshakers survive today, The ones that do can fetch a pretty high price at auction. The one in the photo above went for $5,290.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Race-Ready 2015 Scott Scale 900 RC Review - Maximum Efficiency, Lightest in Class


2015 Scott Scale 900 RC - Impressive Stiffness, Handling and Remote Suspension Creates a Top Value Superbike.


Ride and handling: click, click, boom 

"One click forward on the neat grip-mounted RideLoc remote lever cuts shock volume and travel (to 85mm), creates a more progressive spring rate and makes pedal nod negligible. Two clicks let you totally lock out both fork and shock for smooth surface situations, and the more time you spend on a Spark the more you’ll get used to toggling the suspension through its modes almost as much as you change gear. SRAM’s XX1/X01 single ring drivetrain means there’s nothing else for your left-hand thumb to do anyway as well as saving a big slab of weight and adding rough terrain chain retention over a twin ring system.


The finishing kit is all race focused,
with a SRAM XX1 drivetrain 
Another weight saving component selection that surprised us with how well it worked was the Ritchey WCS Streem Evo saddle. We’ve raced on SDG’s I-Beam system for years because it’s absolutely bombproof in terms of saddle stability and really light, but we’ve always had to accept a brutally firm ride from the solid base single rail saddle. Ritchey’s saddle uses a similar single beam design, but with a long cutout between saddle and rail that allows almost as much flex as a conventional saddle. The Schwalbe Rocket Rons are a generous enough volume to add float to the ride and reduce vibration fatigue over long marathon sessions too.

Having ridden the Spark family through various generations we know that the unique twin chamber shocks needed for the multi-mode remote control suspension have always come at a cost in terms of ultimate suspension control compared with conventional dampers. What surprised us in the desert was how sorted the Scott felt on the terrain it’s designed for.



Yes, you can get the shock to clatter and choke slightly if you really batter it into staccato rock sections or sequential step-downs. Over random rough trails, braking bumps and even off single drops it was much more composed, keeping the bike taut and driving hard in Traction mode or sucking up hits and maintaining descending momentum well in full open mode. Front and rear shocks work well in tandem, so once you’re dialled into the XC-style handling it’s a bike that lets you get away with far more than you expect at first – and one you soon come to rely on to push the pace properly hard on technical trails.

The only obvious issue we had once we started dropping our shoulders and taking liberties with lines is that it could wander off the narrow desert singletrack easily, then struggle to cut back quick enough to avoid a spill. Swapping wheels with a Niner we were also testing proved it was twangy wheels that were the culprits, not a fork or chassis issue. Given the impressive level of spec and super-light performance of the frame, it’s still very good value for riders after a seriously high velocity yet surprisingly fun and versatile machine."

Ride Review done by Guy Kesteven of Bike Radar


See the Bike online HERE


Come in TODAY and see this bike up close and personal! 
We would love to help you pick out your first or your next bike!



Circle City Bicycles and Fitness
5506 Madison Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
(317) 786-9244

Bike to the Ballpark

A previous Bike to the Ballpark event.
INDIANAPOLIS INDIANS HOME OPENER TONIGHT APRIL 9, 2015
Each season, Sun King Brewery, the official Craft Beer of the Indianapolis Indians, invites fans to "Bike to the Ballpark" for the home opener. The event is free and open to riders of all ages.
Tickets to the Indians Opening Day contest are not included as part of the Bike to the Ballpark event, however participants are encouraged to purchase a ticket and join-in on the festivities that also include a special tapping of Sun King.
Last season, as part of the annual event, Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard along with several hundred biking enthusiasts made the short 1.7-mile ride through downtown from the South Parking lot of Sun King Brewery to Victory Field. At the ballpark, riders parked their bikes at racks set up at the Convention Center, across the street from Victory Field's center field entrance at the corner of West and Maryland streets.
For more information go to Tickets@IndyIndians.com or (317) 269-3545.



Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Super Light Bicycle

Lighter than carbon fiber.
Here's an example of new technology that is much lighter than carbon fiber.  These new bikes are filled with air and are collapsible to fit inside your pocket.  Each time you deflate it however, it does take a bit of time to re-build it.  If you happen to know a performing Clown, you may also have your Balloon Bike Mechanic.  Now riding them is a whole other story.  While lighter than carbon fiber, these Balloon Bikes basically have zero strength.  If you should try and sit on one, you would just fall to the ground thus making riding it impossible.  Visit Circle City Bicycles and get the real deal on light and functional bikes.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Do You Need A New Helmet? Protect Your Head At All Costs.

Unhappy With Your Helmet?


We all know the importance of wearing a helmet, but are you sure that your helmet is going to protect you if you crash?


Here are some ways to know if it is time to replace your helmet.












1. You have been in a significant accident or a fall


EPS foam is made to compress upon heavy impact. This disperses the force of the impact so that the helmet, not your skull, is taking the brunt of the blow. However, EPS foam does not completely regain its shape after a major impact. The bottom line from every source is that, if the helmet has been in an accident, replace it, even if it does not look damaged.



2. The outside of your helmet is just foam or cloth instead of plastic, or it doesn't have a CPSC, ASTM or Snell sticker inside (or you just can't get it to fit!)



Obviously foam and cloth are not protective enough, but there are still some helmets floating around out there that aren't up to the safety code that manufacturers established in the 90s. Anything that doesn't fit is probably not good for your ride.



3. Helmets get better every year

Helmet manufacturers (just like the rest of the bike industry) have gotten better and better at producing the safest, coolest, lightest weight helmets every year. All of these newly designed features can make it worthwhile to upgrade your helmet regularly.

 

4. Helmet manufacturers recommend replacing helmets every five years. 


The biggest reason they suggest this is not to try to sell a bunch of new helmets every five years, rather it is because the materials in a helmet break down over time causing the helmet to lose some of its impact-absorbing ability. That means if you crash - you may be at risk!


5. It isn't a helmet designed for cycling


It's a good idea to wear a different helmet for each sport you participate in. If you skateboard or do some activity where you crash regularly, you may not want to wear that helmet for cycling, as it could be less prepared for the types of falls that can occur when riding.


 

Did You Enjoy This Post?

Check Out: 7 Best Core Training Exercises For Cyclists








Circle City Bicycles and Fitness
5506 Madison Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
(317) 786-9244


Monday, April 6, 2015

Mountain Biking in Indianapolis

Mountain biking in Southwestway Park (Photo courtesy of Visit Indy)
If you talk with most mountain bikers in Indianapolis, they will tell you about Town Run Park on the north side. For us southsiders there are a number of closer trails over at Southwestway Park. They have five different trails ranging from easy to intermediate. The DINO (Do INdiana Off-road) series will have mountain bike races at Southwestway Park on Sunday, August 30. Most people are surprised that there is something this nice within Marion county. In 2014 Scott Bicycles had a demo day at the park where riders could try out various mountain bikes (and a few road bikes as well). We're hoping they will do it again this year.

To get to Southwestway Park, just take Southport Road west across White River (If you are going there on your bike be very careful - The traffic on Southport can be pretty bad). Head south when you hit Mann Road, and Southwestway Park will be on your left. There is no admission charge.

Here is a video of some of the mountain bike trails. There is additional information on this & other local trails at our Indianapolis Area Mountain Biking Trails web page. If you are needing a new mountain bike, be sure to contact Circle City Bicycles at 317-786-9244. Bill or one of the other guys will get you set up with the latest and greatest for off-road riding. We also have some closeout mountain bikes listed towards the bottom on our main page

Friday, April 3, 2015

Friday Photo - Bicycle Touring Western Ireland

Circle City Bicycles customer Todd & his wife Anita touring western Ireland

Todd, one of our best customers, went bicycle touring in western Ireland with his wife in 2012. They went on a tour with CycleWest Ireland. This photo is one of four that now rotate on the main page of their website.

In the photo you can see Todd and Anita on their Co-Motion tandem, with Arkel panniers in the rear. Todd has an Ireland jersey and his with has a Gore jacket, all of which were purchased from Circle City Bicycles. Here is Anita's account of the trip:
Three years ago, my husband and I experienced one of the most memorable vacations of our lives when we visited Ireland! The clear, blue sky allowed us a picturesque view of the emerald green island as our airplane landed in Dublin.  From Dublin, we boarded a bus and crossed the island to spend the night in the beautiful west coast city of Galway.  The big cities were interesting, but the small, guided bike tour with Cycle West Ireland allowed us to explore the countryside and experience the culture and sights in a more personal way.
Life for us slowed down as we took in all of the sights on our tandem: miles and miles of green landscape or cliffs meeting the deep blue Atlantic Ocean, the beautiful Connemara Mountains in the background, inland lakes, and wildflowers of every color imaginable.  Houses and condominiums do not dot the coastline; just an occasional free range Connemara Pony or sheep became part of the ocean view landscape. Other animals we saw along the way were free range cattle, donkeys, rabbits, lots of birds, and seals.  Most of the time, we had the entire road to ourselves.  The only “traffic jam” we had to stop for was waiting for a shepherd to cross the road with his sheep!
We spent the night in quaint inns with delicious food, wonderful accommodations, and warm, welcoming hosts. The people of Ireland reflected the slower pace of life we were so enjoying on our tandem. Before the tour started, we were a little worried about exploring the county of my ancestry on our own, but a local assured us “You are never lost in Ireland as long as you have a tongue!” The pace of life seemed so much slower there and people always seemed to have time to talk and listen. It was truly a vacation of a lifetime.  Would I return to the Emerald Isle if given the opportunity?  Yes, in a heartbeat!


Thursday, April 2, 2015

Are You Looking For A New Bike? We Can Help You Decide

NEW YouTube Channel — Thanks for Visiting Our Blog.

 

 

Our YouTube Channel will soon featuring how-to videos, 2015 bike reviews, and more! Subscribe!

 

 













Circle City Bicycles and Fitness
5506 Madison Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46227
(317) 786-9244


Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Riding in a Circle

Literally Riding in a Circle
Someone figured out how to ride outdoors, actually move but, get nowhere.  This is the ultimate riding machine for not travelling.  You just get a bunch of friends together and say "hey, let's go for a bike ride!" and run out and jump on the Circle Bike.  You can ride as long as you want and still be a few steps from home.  While a Circle Bike would not be right for everyone, it is the best bike for going left.  They should have one of these bikes at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway since it is the king of going left.  At Circle City Bicycles we might not offer bikes that only go left, we do offer a wide variety of bicycles that go left, right and forward.  Pay us a visit sometime.